The Art of William H. Warrington — vulcanhammer.info

This post is something of a departure, in that it features the pencil sketch art of my great uncle, William H. Warrington (right, from his carte de visite.) But first some background is in order. William H. Warrington was born 17 September 1846, grew up in Chicago, Illinois. He became the manager of the Vulcan […]

via The Art of William H. Warrington — vulcanhammer.info

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Compressible Flow Through Nozzles, and the Vulcan 06 Valve

vulcanhammer.info

Most of our fluid mechanics offerings are on our companion site, Chet Aero Marine.  This topic, and the way we plan to treat it, is so intertwined with the history of Vulcan’s product line that we’re posting it here.  Hopefully it will be useful in understanding both.  It’s a offshoot of Vulcan’s valve loss study in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, and it led to an important decision in that effort.  I am indebted to Bob Daniel at Georgia Tech for this presentation.

Basics of Compressible Flow Through Nozzles and Other Orifices

The basics of incompressible flow through nozzles, and the losses that take place, is discussed here in detail.  The first complicating factor when adding compressibility is the density change in the fluid.  For this study we will consider only ideal gases.

Consider a simple orifice configuration such as is shown below.

Daniel-Orifice-Diagram

The mass flow…

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‘The stuff the movie-makers dream of.’ In Lake Michigan, a graveyard of long-lost ships captivates historians

After a year of scouring the depths of Lake Michigan with a sonar-equipped fishing boat, Steve Radovan finally got a hit on the gray-scale monitor in the captain’s cabin in May 2016.

The 71-year-old shipwreck enthusiast powered down the Discovery’s engines and dropped a waterproof camera attached to a rope into roughly 300 feet of water. The images revealed a three-masted barquentine, covered in mussels and algae but lying on the bottom still largely intact. After reporting the finding to the state of Wisconsin, he learned the foundered ship was the Mojave…

For the full story click here

Testa’s Restaurant: an old Favourite of Chet and Myrtle’s Closes to Rebuild

Testa’s restaurant in Palm Beach, an old hangout of Chet and Myrtle Warrington in their years in Palm Beach, closes 15 July 2017 to rebuild. Testa’s was started in 1921, moved to its current location and building in 1946, a couple of years before Chet’s yacht tied up at the West Palm Beach Municipal Marina shown below.

It remained a favourite of theirs until Chet’s death in 1961 and Myrtle’s in 1976.

Chicago Yacht Club Regatta, Late 1940’s

Following are some photographs from a Chicago Yacht Club regatta on Lake Michigan in the late 1940’s.

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I can’t be more specific about the date; however, one of Chet’s signature achievements at the Club took place in June 1946 when he, as Chairman of the Power Yacht Committee, helped to instigate the Commodore Fleet Review.  That helped launch his bid to become Commodore of the Club in 1950, fifty years after his father had held the post.  Given the large number of sail boats shown, it’s probably another event, but I’m pretty sure it’s in that era.

Enjoy!